Chronicles of Survival

Queer Xicano-Boricua de Chicago.

Nepantla y Con Safos

c/s

A great tree fell today
It’s tall limbs
Cut down to the earth
By machines of men.
I walked to the spot
Where the tree once stood
And felt for its roots
Beneath an unspeaking ground.
Life once stretched in the sky
Braving the years and storms
A great tree has fallen
And stands no more.

c/s


César Chávez and Bobby Seale meet students from Malcolm X Elementary [1972]

“If everyone is a product of this society, who will say the things that need to be said, and do the things that need to be done, without compromise? Truth will never start out popular in a world more concerned with marketability than righteousness. It will initially suffer ridicule and even violence — yet ultimately it is undeniable. All of humanity is living in a dream world, but suffering real consequences.”

—   Lauryn Hill  (via america-wakiewakie)

(via queergiftedblack)

postracialcomments:

breanna1227:

postracialcomments:


A Texas man is under arrest after gunning down a SWAT team member as the officer quietly tried to climb in through the apartment’s window during predawn hours.
Police State USAreports  that a resident fatally shot Detective Charles “Chuck” Dinwiddie as the officer climbed in through a ground level window as part of a “no knock” raid. The officers were there due to suspicion that residents were in possession of controlled substances.
Upon hearing a noise, resident Marvin Louis Guy, 50, opened fire on the unidentified officers, shooting three others as well, although only one fatally.
Guy is currently being held on capital murder charges in connection with Dinwiddie’s death, even though it’s unclear how Guy was supposed to know that the men crawling in through the window were police officers since they hadn’t identified themselves.
The evidence sheet lists a laptop, a safe, a pistol, and a glass pipe, but no drugs were found. Given the evidence, why did police deem it necessary to seek a “no knock” warrant and why did a judge sign off on it?
Very little is known about Mr. Guy, but Dinwiddie left behind two children, all because his SWAT team went creeping into a home where the residents didn’t even have any drugs. Is that the best use of law enforcement tax dollars?
Guy’s bond has been set at $3 million dollars.

Source
Thank you lieutenantnorals!

Where’s stand your ground now?????

Texas people!!
Isn’t there a law where it is legal to shoot to kill on your property if there’s a physical threat? Esp if they broke in your home?

postracialcomments:

breanna1227:

postracialcomments:

A Texas man is under arrest after gunning down a SWAT team member as the officer quietly tried to climb in through the apartment’s window during predawn hours.

Police State USAreports  that a resident fatally shot Detective Charles “Chuck” Dinwiddie as the officer climbed in through a ground level window as part of a “no knock” raid. The officers were there due to suspicion that residents were in possession of controlled substances.

Upon hearing a noise, resident Marvin Louis Guy, 50, opened fire on the unidentified officers, shooting three others as well, although only one fatally.

Guy is currently being held on capital murder charges in connection with Dinwiddie’s death, even though it’s unclear how Guy was supposed to know that the men crawling in through the window were police officers since they hadn’t identified themselves.

The evidence sheet lists a laptop, a safe, a pistol, and a glass pipe, but no drugs were found. Given the evidence, why did police deem it necessary to seek a “no knock” warrant and why did a judge sign off on it?

Very little is known about Mr. Guy, but Dinwiddie left behind two children, all because his SWAT team went creeping into a home where the residents didn’t even have any drugs. Is that the best use of law enforcement tax dollars?

Guy’s bond has been set at $3 million dollars.

Source

Thank you lieutenantnorals!

Where’s stand your ground now?????

Texas people!!

Isn’t there a law where it is legal to shoot to kill on your property if there’s a physical threat? Esp if they broke in your home?

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

classicladiesofcolor:

Ruby Berkley Goodwin appeared in numerous movies and television shows throughout the late 1950s. However, her work off-screen made (and makes) her iconic. 
She was born in DuQuoin, Illinois on October 17, 1903. She described her childhood as “ordinary”. Her family was couldn’t afford to buy her many toys, so young Ruby made toys and games out of household objects. Of course, such an imagination made an artist out of Goodwin—specifically a writer.
Ruby Berkley Goodwin grew up to become Black Hollywood’s premier columnist. She also wrote a book of poems, From My Kitchen Window (published in 1942) and an autobiography, It’s Good to Be Black (published in 1953). Ms. Goodwin was also a publicist for Hattie McDaniel and Ethel Waters.
[Source 1] [Source 2] [Source 3] [Source 4] 
Afro American (newspaper) columns: November 1931 article / July 1942 article

classicladiesofcolor:

Ruby Berkley Goodwin appeared in numerous movies and television shows throughout the late 1950s. However, her work off-screen made (and makes) her iconic. 

She was born in DuQuoin, Illinois on October 17, 1903. She described her childhood as “ordinary”. Her family was couldn’t afford to buy her many toys, so young Ruby made toys and games out of household objects. Of course, such an imagination made an artist out of Goodwin—specifically a writer.

Ruby Berkley Goodwin grew up to become Black Hollywood’s premier columnist. She also wrote a book of poems, From My Kitchen Window (published in 1942) and an autobiography, It’s Good to Be Black (published in 1953). Ms. Goodwin was also a publicist for Hattie McDaniel and Ethel Waters.

[Source 1] [Source 2] [Source 3] [Source 4

Afro American (newspaper) columns: November 1931 article / July 1942 article

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

BREAKING: Missouri legislator pushed to have names of police in officer involved shootings kept secret

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

afro-dominicano:

thepoliticalfreakshow:

Democratic Missouri State Representative Jeff Roorda-D Barnhart introduced a bill in the Missouri Legislature to keep the name of police officers who shoot someone in the line of duty a secret.

Roorda said he introduced the bill in 2009 out of safety concerns for police officers.

“Releasing a name could put someone in grave jeopardy,” Roorda said.

Roorda is also the business manager of the St. Louis Police Officers’ Association. The bill would have prevented the public from obtaining any records and documents involving police shootings if those documents contained the name of the officer who pulled the trigger.

Roorda said he was concerned about retaliation.

“That someone would retaliate, think they did something wrong and try to hurt them or their family,” Roorda said.

The bill never became law. The Police Officer’s Association eventually reached a compromise with the St. Louis Police Department. The department agreed to not release the name of the officer if it felt the officer could face a threat. After the compromise, Roorda decided not to pursue the legislation.

Roorda said he is concerned about the safety of Darren Wilson, the officer who shot Michael Brown, Jr, but Roorda is not commenting on the decision to release Wilson’s name.

“I’m not going to second guess Chief Jackson for releasing it, just like I’m not going to second guess him if he had not released it,” Roorda said.

Roorda said he has no plans to re-introduce the legislation. He said state law says the decision to release the name of an officer involved in a shooting must be done on a case by case basis.

The protecting white cop criminals fad is getting old af real fast.

racism is a system

if you didn’t get it then, you should get it now people! 

Americans spend more than thirty billion dollars a year on security… it is the fear of threat rather than a real threat that is the catalyst for an obsession with safety that borders on madness.

Culturally we bear witness to this madness every day. We can all tell endless stories of how it makes itself known in everyday life. For example, an adult white male answers the door when a young Asian male rings the bell. We live in a culture where without responding to any gesture of aggression or hostility on the part of the stranger, who is simply lost and trying to find the correct address, the white male shoots him, believing he is protecting his life and his property. This is an everyday example of madness. The person who is really the threat here is the home owner who has been so well socialized by the thinking of white supremacy, of capitalism, of patriarchy that he can no longer respond rationally.

White supremacy has taught him that all people of color are threats irrespective of their behavior. Capitalism has taught him that, at all costs, his property can and must be protected. Patriarchy has taught him that his masculinity has to be proved by the willingess to conquer fea through aggression; that it would be unmanly to ask questions before taking action. Mass media then brings us the news of this in a newspeak manner that sounds almost jocular and celebratory, as though no tragedy has happened, as though the sacrifice of a young life was necessary to uphold property values and white patriarchal honor. Viewers are encouraged to feel sympathy for the white male home owner who made a mistake. The fact that this mistake led to the violent death of an innocent young man does not register; the narrative is worded in a manner that encourages viewers to identify with the one who made the mistake by doing what we are led to feel we might all do to “protect our property at all costs from any sense of perceived threat.” This is what the worship of death looks like.

—   bell hooks | all about love: new visions (via soyvietnamita)

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

Thousands of black and Latino kids lost their schools in 2013

(Source: wearethedistricts, via strugglingtobeheard)

readcolor:

nayyirah waheed | u.s. | daughters of africa by margaret busby  | english | anthology | ‘i was recently gifted with this anthology signed by the author/editor herself, the inscription reads ‘for nayyirah, a daughter of africa. may you be inspired.’ inspiration is beyond what i have received from this anthology. this work is a home. a house i walked into, and saw myself reflected everywhere. from time and through time. as a writer/artist of african descent, this compilation offered me a rest, recognition, pride, and joy, that overwhelmed. here is an excerpt from the book jacket, ‘…arranged chronologically, it charts a literary canon from the ancient egyptian queen hatshepsut and the queen of sheba, to popular contemporaries such as maya angelou, alice walker, and bauchi emecheta. it also includes many lesser known writers, and anonymous traditional works that exemplify the oral tradition handed down through generations. by placing side by side literature and orature from africa, the americas, the carribean and europe, new and exciting links are revealed as the common influences are traced and reclaimed for the first time. it brings together over two hundred women from across the globe- from antigua to zimbabwe, angola to the usa - to show the remarkable range of the african diaspora. and besides translations from african languages, includes work originally in dutch, french, german, portuguese, russian, spanish, and turkish. in addition to celebrating a unifying heritage, ‘daughters of africa’ testifies to the variety among these women, as demonstrated by the wealth of genres in which they express themselves: autobiography, memoirs, oral history, letters, diaries, short stories, novels (experimental, historical, science fiction) poetry, drama, humour, non-fiction (political, feminist, anthropological) journalism, speeches, essays, folklore. introduced by margaret busby and complete with biographical headnotes, annotation, and valuable extensive bibliographies, this unique chronicle of black women writers throughout the world charts their continuing literary contributions as never before.’ published in england, in 1992, ‘daughters of africa’ is a wide, sweeping, and intricate geography of writings by women of african descent through the ages. it is a critically important work and tenderly curated labor of love (a soul deep gratitude to margaret busby), which deserves a resurgence and should be a widely known reader and resource. in the home. in the educational sphere. in the world. this anthology celebrates and illuminates the reality that not only do women of african descent have a history, we are history.’ #ireadCOLORbecause it is a soft place to land. #readCOLOR #ireadCOLOR #writeCOLOR #iwriteCOLOR #daughtersofafrica #margaretbusby #books #literature #authorsofcolor #poc #diasporas #writers #readers #goodreads #instagood #tumblr #twitter #follow #summerreading #book #love #bookclub #literacy #global

readcolor:

nayyirah waheed | u.s. | daughters of africa by margaret busby | english | anthology | ‘i was recently gifted with this anthology signed by the author/editor herself, the inscription reads ‘for nayyirah, a daughter of africa. may you be inspired.’ inspiration is beyond what i have received from this anthology. this work is a home. a house i walked into, and saw myself reflected everywhere. from time and through time. as a writer/artist of african descent, this compilation offered me a rest, recognition, pride, and joy, that overwhelmed. here is an excerpt from the book jacket, ‘…arranged chronologically, it charts a literary canon from the ancient egyptian queen hatshepsut and the queen of sheba, to popular contemporaries such as maya angelou, alice walker, and bauchi emecheta. it also includes many lesser known writers, and anonymous traditional works that exemplify the oral tradition handed down through generations. by placing side by side literature and orature from africa, the americas, the carribean and europe, new and exciting links are revealed as the common influences are traced and reclaimed for the first time. it brings together over two hundred women from across the globe- from antigua to zimbabwe, angola to the usa - to show the remarkable range of the african diaspora. and besides translations from african languages, includes work originally in dutch, french, german, portuguese, russian, spanish, and turkish. in addition to celebrating a unifying heritage, ‘daughters of africa’ testifies to the variety among these women, as demonstrated by the wealth of genres in which they express themselves: autobiography, memoirs, oral history, letters, diaries, short stories, novels (experimental, historical, science fiction) poetry, drama, humour, non-fiction (political, feminist, anthropological) journalism, speeches, essays, folklore. introduced by margaret busby and complete with biographical headnotes, annotation, and valuable extensive bibliographies, this unique chronicle of black women writers throughout the world charts their continuing literary contributions as never before.’ published in england, in 1992, ‘daughters of africa’ is a wide, sweeping, and intricate geography of writings by women of african descent through the ages. it is a critically important work and tenderly curated labor of love (a soul deep gratitude to margaret busby), which deserves a resurgence and should be a widely known reader and resource. in the home. in the educational sphere. in the world. this anthology celebrates and illuminates the reality that not only do women of african descent have a history, we are history.’ #ireadCOLORbecause it is a soft place to land. #readCOLOR #ireadCOLOR #writeCOLOR #iwriteCOLOR #daughtersofafrica #margaretbusby #books #literature #authorsofcolor #poc #diasporas #writers #readers #goodreads #instagood #tumblr #twitter #follow #summerreading #book #love #bookclub #literacy #global

(via suenosdesirena)

somehowfurious:

kissing-monsters:

apiphile:

sexxxisbeautiful:

pizzagrrrl:

Peggielene Bartels, A.K.A. King Peggy, is currently the King of Otuam, Ghana. She was chosen to be one of only three female kings in Ghana, and when she discovered that male chauvinists wanted her to only be a figurehead, she said: “They were treating me like I am a second-class citizen because I am a woman. I said, ‘Hell no, you’re not going to do this to a woman!’” When she encountered corruption and the threat of embezzlement to the royal funds, she declared “I’m going to squeeze their balls so hard their eyes pop!”
King Peggy has maintained her work in Ghana’s embassy in Washington, D.C. while making education affordable in Otuam, installing borehead wells to produce clean drinking water, enforcing incarceration laws to deal with domestic violence, replenishing the royal coffers by taxing Otuam’s fishing industry to improve life in the village, and appointing three women to her council.
“Nobody should tell you, ‘You’re a woman, you can’t do it,’” she insists. “You can do it. Be ready to accept it when the calling comes.”
Quoted from the Spring/Summer 2012 issue of Ms. Magazine.

What a beautiful badass woman.

King Peggy has been on my blog before but this is my goddamn blog and I will have King Peggy on here twice if I want.

MORE FEMALE KINGS.

Always reblog King Peggy, who is on my dash far less than she should be. Did you know she has written a book about her life? It is great, and you should all get right on that if you haven’t already.


Que viva!

somehowfurious:

kissing-monsters:

apiphile:

sexxxisbeautiful:

pizzagrrrl:

Peggielene Bartels, A.K.A. King Peggy, is currently the King of Otuam, Ghana. She was chosen to be one of only three female kings in Ghana, and when she discovered that male chauvinists wanted her to only be a figurehead, she said: “They were treating me like I am a second-class citizen because I am a woman. I said, ‘Hell no, you’re not going to do this to a woman!’” When she encountered corruption and the threat of embezzlement to the royal funds, she declared “I’m going to squeeze their balls so hard their eyes pop!”

King Peggy has maintained her work in Ghana’s embassy in Washington, D.C. while making education affordable in Otuam, installing borehead wells to produce clean drinking water, enforcing incarceration laws to deal with domestic violence, replenishing the royal coffers by taxing Otuam’s fishing industry to improve life in the village, and appointing three women to her council.

“Nobody should tell you, ‘You’re a woman, you can’t do it,’” she insists. “You can do it. Be ready to accept it when the calling comes.”

Quoted from the Spring/Summer 2012 issue of Ms. Magazine.

What a beautiful badass woman.

King Peggy has been on my blog before but this is my goddamn blog and I will have King Peggy on here twice if I want.

MORE FEMALE KINGS.

Always reblog King Peggy, who is on my dash far less than she should be. Did you know she has written a book about her life? It is great, and you should all get right on that if you haven’t already.

Que viva!

(Source: pizza-grrrl, via suenosdesirena)