Chronicles of Survival

Alec

Two Spirited Xicano-Boricua born and raised in the Chi.

Nepantla y Con Safos
c/s

“Not everyone you lose is a loss.”

—   (via sativa13)

(Source: starlate, via quemandomente)

silversarcasm:

[Gifset: Laverne Cox speaks at the GLAAD media awards, she says,

"Each and every one of us has the capacity to be an oppressor. I want to encourage each and every one of us to interrogate how we might be an oppressor, and how we might be able to become liberators for ourselves and each other."]

femmeanddangerous:

(x)

(Source: fuckyeahlavernecox, via malcojido)

nedahoyin:

fyahblaze:

blackfeminism:

ourtimeorg:

If you don’t know who Johnnie Tillmon was, look her up.

Welfare is a Women’s Issue (1972) by Johnnie Tillmon
I’m a woman. I’m a black woman. I’m a poor woman. I’m a fat woman. I’m a middle-aged woman. And I’m on welfare.
In this country, if you’re any one of those things you count less as a human being. If you’re all those things, you don’t count at all. Except as a statistic.
I am 45 years old. I have raised six children. There are millions of statistics like me. Some on welfare. Some not. And some, really poor, who don’t even know they’re entitled to welfare. Not all of them are black. Not at all. In fact, the majority-about two-thirds-of all the poor families in the country are white.
Welfare’s like a traffic accident. It can happen to anybody, but especially it happens to women.
And that’s why welfare is a women’s issue. For a lot of middle-class women in this country, Women’s Liberation is a matter of concern. For women on welfare it’s a matter of survival.
Survival. That’s why we had to go on welfare. And that’s why we can’t get off welfare now. Not us women. Not until we do something about liberating poor women in this country.
Because up until now we’ve been raised to expect to work, all our lives, for nothing. Because we are the worst educated, the least-skilled, and the lowest-paid people there are. Because we have to be almost totally responsible for our children. Because we are regarded by everybody as dependents. That’s why we are on welfare. And that’s why we stay on it.
Welfare is the most prejudiced institution in this country, even more than marriage, which it tries to imitate. Let me explain that a little.
Ninety-nine percent of welfare families are headed by women. There is no man around. In half the states there can’t be men around because A.F.D.C. (Aid to Families With Dependent Children) says if there is an “able-bodied” man around, then you can’t be on welfare. If the kids are going to eat, and the man can’t get a job, then he’s got to go.
Welfare is like a super-sexist marriage. You trade in a man for the man. But you can’t divorce him if he treats you bad. He can divorce you, of course, cut you off anytime he wants. But in that case, he keeps the kids, not you.The man runs everything. In ordinary marriage, sex is supposed to be for your husband. On A.F.D.C., you’re not supposed to have any sex at all. You give up control of your own body. It’s a condition of aid. You may even have to agree to get your tubes tied so you can never have more children just to avoid being cut off welfare.
The man, the welfare system, controls your money. He tells you what to buy, what not to buy, where to buy it, and how much things cost. If things-rent, for instance-really cost more than he says they do, it’s just too bad for you. He’s always right.
That’s why Governor [Ronald] Reagan can get away with slandering welfare recipients, calling them “lazy parasites,” “pigs at the trough,” and such. We’ve been trained to believe that the only reason people are on welfare is because there’s something wrong with their character. If people have “motivation,” if people only want to work, they can, and they will be able to support themselves and their kids in decency.
The truth is a job doesn’t necessarily mean an adequate income. There are some ten million jobs that now pay less than the minimum wage, and if you’re a woman, you’ve got the best chance of getting one. Why would a 45-year-old woman work all day in a laundry ironing shirts at 90-some cents an hour? Because she knows there’s some place lower she could be. She could be on welfare. Society needs women on welfare as “examples” to let every woman, factory workers and housewife workers alike, know what will happen if she lets up, if she’s laid off, if she tries to go it alone without a man. So these ladies stay on their feet or on their knees all their lives instead of asking why they’re only getting 90-some cents an hour, instead of daring to fight and complain.
Maybe we poor welfare women will really liberate women in this country. We’ve already started on our own welfare plan. Along with other welfare recipients, we have organized so we can have some voice. Our group is called the National Welfare Rights Organization (N.W.R.O.). We put together our own welfare plan, called Guaranteed Adequate Income (G.A.I.), which would eliminate sexism from welfare. There would be no “categories”-men, women, children, single, married, kids, no kids-just poor people who need aid. You’d get paid according to need and family size only and that would be upped as the cost of living goes up.
As far as I’m concerned, the ladies of N.W.R.O. are the front-line troops of women’s freedom. Both because we have so few illusions and because our issues are so important to all women-the right to a living wage for women’s work, the right to life itself.

still relevant today

Forever reblog..

nedahoyin:

fyahblaze:

blackfeminism:

ourtimeorg:

If you don’t know who Johnnie Tillmon was, look her up.

Welfare is a Women’s Issue (1972) by Johnnie Tillmon

I’m a woman. I’m a black woman. I’m a poor woman. I’m a fat woman. I’m a middle-aged woman. And I’m on welfare.

In this country, if you’re any one of those things you count less as a human being. If you’re all those things, you don’t count at all. Except as a statistic.

I am 45 years old. I have raised six children. There are millions of statistics like me. Some on welfare. Some not. And some, really poor, who don’t even know they’re entitled to welfare. Not all of them are black. Not at all. In fact, the majority-about two-thirds-of all the poor families in the country are white.

Welfare’s like a traffic accident. It can happen to anybody, but especially it happens to women.

And that’s why welfare is a women’s issue. For a lot of middle-class women in this country, Women’s Liberation is a matter of concern. For women on welfare it’s a matter of survival.

Survival. That’s why we had to go on welfare. And that’s why we can’t get off welfare now. Not us women. Not until we do something about liberating poor women in this country.

Because up until now we’ve been raised to expect to work, all our lives, for nothing. Because we are the worst educated, the least-skilled, and the lowest-paid people there are. Because we have to be almost totally responsible for our children. Because we are regarded by everybody as dependents. That’s why we are on welfare. And that’s why we stay on it.

Welfare is the most prejudiced institution in this country, even more than marriage, which it tries to imitate. Let me explain that a little.

Ninety-nine percent of welfare families are headed by women. There is no man around. In half the states there can’t be men around because A.F.D.C. (Aid to Families With Dependent Children) says if there is an “able-bodied” man around, then you can’t be on welfare. If the kids are going to eat, and the man can’t get a job, then he’s got to go.

Welfare is like a super-sexist marriage. You trade in a man for the man. But you can’t divorce him if he treats you bad. He can divorce you, of course, cut you off anytime he wants. But in that case, he keeps the kids, not you.The man runs everything. In ordinary marriage, sex is supposed to be for your husband. On A.F.D.C., you’re not supposed to have any sex at all. You give up control of your own body. It’s a condition of aid. You may even have to agree to get your tubes tied so you can never have more children just to avoid being cut off welfare.

The man, the welfare system, controls your money. He tells you what to buy, what not to buy, where to buy it, and how much things cost. If things-rent, for instance-really cost more than he says they do, it’s just too bad for you. He’s always right.

That’s why Governor [Ronald] Reagan can get away with slandering welfare recipients, calling them “lazy parasites,” “pigs at the trough,” and such. We’ve been trained to believe that the only reason people are on welfare is because there’s something wrong with their character. If people have “motivation,” if people only want to work, they can, and they will be able to support themselves and their kids in decency.

The truth is a job doesn’t necessarily mean an adequate income. There are some ten million jobs that now pay less than the minimum wage, and if you’re a woman, you’ve got the best chance of getting one. Why would a 45-year-old woman work all day in a laundry ironing shirts at 90-some cents an hour? Because she knows there’s some place lower she could be. She could be on welfare. Society needs women on welfare as “examples” to let every woman, factory workers and housewife workers alike, know what will happen if she lets up, if she’s laid off, if she tries to go it alone without a man. So these ladies stay on their feet or on their knees all their lives instead of asking why they’re only getting 90-some cents an hour, instead of daring to fight and complain.

Maybe we poor welfare women will really liberate women in this country. We’ve already started on our own welfare plan. Along with other welfare recipients, we have organized so we can have some voice. Our group is called the National Welfare Rights Organization (N.W.R.O.). We put together our own welfare plan, called Guaranteed Adequate Income (G.A.I.), which would eliminate sexism from welfare. There would be no “categories”-men, women, children, single, married, kids, no kids-just poor people who need aid. You’d get paid according to need and family size only and that would be upped as the cost of living goes up.

As far as I’m concerned, the ladies of N.W.R.O. are the front-line troops of women’s freedom. Both because we have so few illusions and because our issues are so important to all women-the right to a living wage for women’s work, the right to life itself.

still relevant today

Forever reblog..

(via labrownrecluse)

entangledrootspress:

Another new print.
"Self-Care"
Lino-cut on reclaimed paper.
For the curious, the plants in the mortar and pestle (from left to right) are Yarrow, Rose, and Bilberry. Hanging behind (also from left to right) are Valerian Root, Colts Foot, Red Clover, Dandelion, Lavender, Meadowsweet, Gravel Root, Purple Coneflower, and Marigold.
You can get a print HERE.

entangledrootspress:

Another new print.

"Self-Care"

Lino-cut on reclaimed paper.

For the curious, the plants in the mortar and pestle (from left to right) are Yarrow, Rose, and Bilberry.
Hanging behind (also from left to right) are Valerian Root, Colts Foot, Red Clover, Dandelion, Lavender, Meadowsweet, Gravel Root, Purple Coneflower, and Marigold.

You can get a print HERE.

(via brujitaxicanita)

“I can’t do a thing about my hyperempathy, no matter what Dad thinks or wants or wishes. I feel what I see others feeling or what I believe they feel. Hyperempathy is what the doctors call an “organic delusional syndrome.” Big shit. It hurts, that’s all I know…I’m crazy. I get a lot of grief that doesn’t belong to me, and that isn’t real. But it hurts.”

—   Octavia Butler (via pleasedonotfeedtheducks)

(via labrownrecluse)

Today In Latin American History

fylatinamericanhistory:

April 8

  • 1827: Puerto Rican nationalist Ramón Emeterio Betances, instigator of the Grito de Lares revolt, is born in Cabo Rojo when the island is still under colonial Spanish rule.
  • 1914: Mexican actress María Félix is born in Álamos, Sonora.
  • 1934: Chicano attorney and writer Oscar Zeta Acosta, author of Autobiography of a Brown Buffalo and The Revolt of the Cockroach People, is born in El Paso, Texas.
  • 2002: Mexican actress María Félix dies in Mexico City at age 88.

(via quisqueyameetsborinken)

“The bravest thing I ever did was continuing my life when I wanted to die.”

—   Juliette Lewis (via onlinecounsellingcollege)

(via foreveromantic)

IF APRIL 8 IS YOUR BIRTHDAY :

Actress Robin Wright (1966) shares your birthday. You are ethical, generous and socially responsible. You care about others both personally in your own sphere, as well as globally. Many of you are active in humanitarian causes. No matter how successful you are, you can be shy, but you are calm and cool under pressure. This year you enter a fresh, new nine-year cycle of discovery and beginnings. Open any door!

—   Georgia Nicols, April 8th horoscope

“If you are asking ever, why is this necessary to talk about power and privilege? I want to you believe me, believe every person who nods when I say this that whether you believe in power and privilege, whether you think that systems of oppression they still affect you. Whether you are a person who lives at the intersections of oppression or someone who has no idea what targets you hold, just know that as I stand up here systems of oppression and the agents (you and us) are working in line to keep this machine going. We are being used as weapons of systems that exclude, abuse and exploit people with limited power and target statuses. If you think that you understand all forms of oppression because you too are marginalized I want you to rethink that. We are taught from childhood to use our position in power, no matter how little power we have to put others down for not having the same power as us. We are taught to deny our experiences and to deny others theirs. We are taught to not believe in each other, to want quick answers, this is our internalized capitalism, to punish ourselves and others and put them through a jury of our oppressive messages (internalized prison industrial system.) We are taught that this is normal. Alejandro Jodorowsky says “Birds born in a cage think fly is an illness” so think about how these systems have caused you to believe that liberation work is impossible that it is pointless simply because you have never been given another way.”

—   Fabian Romero [excerpt from the keynote speech at Southeast Regional Unity Conference April 13, 2013 at UNC Chapel Hill]  (via fabianswriting)

(via nomadasolitaria)

the vision

In the dream
We are free
A permanent liberation
of people.

c/s