Chronicles of Survival

Xicano-Boricua de Chicago.

Nepantla y Con Safos

c/s

goldensnatch:

50 years ago and it’s still applicable smh

goldensnatch:

50 years ago and it’s still applicable smh

(Source: wocinsolidarity, via suenosdesirena)

“When temptation claims your reason, know that misfortune is about to strike.
Fall down, prostrate, and begin to Pray.
With flowing tears implore the Lord that He may deliver you from the throes of doubt.”

—   Rumi  (via thelittlephilosopher)

(Source: saalik, via mayan-buddhist-confusion)

“Of course I know the history of my people in this country: I know that my people have never arrived at any position in this country, not even individual positions, without the shedding of blood and mass struggle. This point must be properly understood. It is only when understanding these points that you can come to see properly the real racist and terroristic nature of the FBI and the C.I.A.

I say I know this and this is clear, all of us knowing here; no one in this room can deny any of the following statements I make:

One, for Africans to sit in a lousy five and ten cent store where they want to be, they have to shed their blood.

For Africans to ride on a bus, even though they pay the same amount of money as everybody else does, in order for them to sit where they want to sit, they have to shed their blood.

For Africans to live in this country anywhere they want to live, even if they have the economic capability of doing so, they have to shed their blood.

For African students to attend universities like any other student in this country, their people must shed their blood.

In order for us to get the vote, which everybody gets just like that, even the immigrant who can’t even speak English coming here, we Africans, in order to get the vote, we must shed our blood.

No one sitting in this audience can show me any example of advancement by the African masses in this country, even individual positions of advancement, which have not been acquired at the price of the shedding of the blood of the masses of our people.”

“You are immortal; you’ve existed for billions of years in different manifestations, because you are Life, and Life cannot die. You are in the trees, the butterflies, the fish, the air, the moon, the sun. Wherever you go, you are there, waiting for yourself.”

—   Don Miguel Ruiz (via makethemdream)

(Source: lifeof-ty, via suenosdesirena)

Black sociologist Jorge da Silva (2008) argues that what happens in Rio de Janeiro is a “scheduled genocide and ethnocide” (1). In his view, it is ethnocide because of the imposition by the dominant group of its value to whom they consider different but can become similar. It is also genocide, however, because the dominant group understands that among those who are different there are those who cannot change, leaving extermination as the only possible solution (5). Silva comprehends as a solution a deep debate within the Brazilian society about racism and the negation that exist a social democracy there. In his view, the absence of discussion is the main tactic of the state and the elite to do not solve the problem.

Scholar João Costa Vargas (2010) argues that anti-black genocide in Rio de Janeiro and throughout the African Diaspora is a race-based and constant process. […] It is important to notice that genocide is not synonymous with murder. Vargas calls attention to William Patterson‘s (1951) analysis that genocide is multidimensional. According to Vargas,

[t]he multidimensional perspective on genocide is expressed in deadly physical violence, institutionalized discrimination by and in the police, courts, and legislatures; psychological terror, economic and political marginalization, and militarization (4).
Another important issue to consider is the intentionality of genocidal state violence. Critiques of the genocide approach to state violence are built on the difficulty, practical impossibility, of proving the state‘s intention to practice genocide. On this issue, Vargas suggests that,
[i]f we were to divert our attention to the search for intentions, or if we did not adopt a systemic and incremental perspective on genocide, such phenomena would appear disparate in space, time, and nature, and there would be no genocide to be accounted for. (5-6)
For Vargas, there is no need to search for intentionality in order “to comprehend that what really matters are the results of such (in)actions, results that are unquestionably racialized and gendered and produce massive harm and death” (4). He affirms that genocide can be seen in everyday forms of discrimination and that the concepts of symbolic violence and the genocidal continuum allow us to understand genocide as the historically persistent erasure of those deemed less than human.”

c-kno-evil:

"I want to set forth this proposition, which will be easier to reject than refute: Black people will never gain full equality in this country. Even those herculean efforts we hail as successful will produce no more than temporary ‘peaks of progress,’ short-lived victories that slide into irrelevance as racial patterns adapt in ways that maintain white dominance. This is a hard-to-accept fact that all history verifies. We must acknowledge it, not as a sign of submission, but as an act of ultimate defiance.” —-Derrick Bell, “Faces at the Bottom of the Well”, p.12, 1992 ================================================ Derrick Albert Bell, Jr. (November 6, 1930 – October 5, 2011) was the first tenured African-American Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and is largely credited as one of the originators of critical race theory (CRT). He was a Visiting Professor at New York University School of Law from 1991 until his death. He was also a former Dean of the University of Oregon School of Law.

c-kno-evil:

"I want to set forth this proposition, which will be easier to reject than refute: Black people will never gain full equality in this country. Even those herculean efforts we hail as successful will produce no more than temporary ‘peaks of progress,’ short-lived victories that slide into irrelevance as racial patterns adapt in ways that maintain white dominance. This is a hard-to-accept fact that all history verifies. We must acknowledge it, not as a sign of submission, but as an act of ultimate defiance.”

—-Derrick Bell, “Faces at the Bottom of the Well”, p.12, 1992
================================================
Derrick Albert Bell, Jr. (November 6, 1930 – October 5, 2011) was the first tenured African-American Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and is largely credited as one of the originators of critical race theory (CRT). He was a Visiting Professor at New York University School of Law from 1991 until his death. He was also a former Dean of the University of Oregon School of Law.

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

“although healing brings a better life, it also threatens to permanently alter life as you’ve known it. your relationships, your position in the world, even your sense of identity may change. coping patterns that have served you for a lifetime will be called into question. when you make the commitment to heal, you risk losing much of what is familiar. as a result one part of you may want to heal while another resists change.”

—   Courage to Heal WB by Laura Davis (via hoodoo-seed)

(Source: speakoutbeheard, via strugglingtobeheard)

“I don’t want to do anything. I don’t want to be anything. I want to disappear elegantly. I want people to look for my goodbye note and find nothing but smoke.”

—   How To Disappear (And Never Come Back Again) | Lora Mathis (via lora-mathis)

(via sierracuse)